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March 5, Sunday

March 6, Monday

March 7, Tuesday

 
CONFERENCE / WORKSHOP
5-7 March, 2006


Religion and State Formation -- Comparative Perspectives from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages


CEU - Popper Room

 

Organisier(s):
Medieval Studies Department, CEU & Religious Studies Program, CEU & Bergen Center for Medieval Studies

Contact person(s):
Annabella Pál

E-mail:
palannab@ceu.hu


In this context, it is understood that the theme "religion and state formation" can usefully be taken to intend both the role of religion in the formative stage of the establishment of a state, and its role in constituting an element -- symbolic, social, legislative, ideological, institutional, separately or together in a variety of combinations -- integral to this state and its apparatuses. It is suggested that in this particular workshop priority be given to the former sense.

1. In terms of geographical and temporal parameters, we have before us in the vista of areas surrounding Romano-Byzantine Europe and the Near East a number of barbarian peoples engaged more or less simultaneously in the adoption of monotheistic religions and the foundation of states: Franks, Goths, Lombards, Nordic peoples, Arabs, Anglo-Saxons, Magyars, Bulgars, Rus and others. This alone justifies the inclusion of Late antiquity and the Middle ages in one compass, given that these events stretched over the period of half a millennium. Many of the polities that emerged recapitulated and in the case of the Near East and South-Eastern Europe calqued notions of state, oecumenism and royalty associated with late Romanity, Byzantium, and the Sassanians. It would be interesting to examine in this purview the consequences of another instance of Völkerwanderung which falls within the temporal and geographical parameters indicated, namely, that of the Turkic peoples -- the Seljuqs and, ultimately, the Ottomans, who were in many ways to repeat the Byzantine state, and to "translate" it.

2. It would be of particular interest for considering the periodisation of medieval history to compare and contrast the role of religion in the formation and consolidation of polities that emerged without the political boundaries of late Romanity (associated with Roman Catholicism) and those that emerged within (post-Byzantine Orthodox polities, the Caliphate). This might usefully be undertaken by examining quite deliberately the geo-political and symbolic elements contained in the notion of translatio imperii, and the institutional, political, ethnogenetic and symbolic connection between state and religion. Correlatively, it would be important to examine real as distinct from symbolic continuities: in terms of royal sacrality, state administration, the tribal as related to the institutional armature of the state, the socio-political and symbolic configuration of the clericy in relation to the gladius, and related matters.

3. In thematic terms, the question of conversion, most saliently the relationship between the conversion to monotheistic faiths of the ruling clan and conversion overall seems to be of special pertinence: socio-political imperatives, geopolitical imperatives (the case of Arianism most especially), cultic centralisation, rudimentary theological elaboration (the significance of Arianism should here be taken into account), the management and "translation" of Pagan sacred spaces, genealogies and beliefs, and areas of institutional, social and cultic eradication, resistance and cooptation.

4. All this, most particularly matters mentioned in the previous paragraph, should be instrumental in helping us understand precisely what might be meant by "christianisation" and "islamisation", and in giving proper consideration to the the question of conversion.




March 5, Sunday



9.30
Excursion to Székesfehérvár (Alba Regia, the oldest royal centre in medieval Hungary) and Veszprém, the centre of medieval Hungarian queens.



March 6, Monday



9.30
Aziz Al Azmeh (CEU, Budapest)– Introduction and welcome


I. Opening Lecture
chaired by Aziz Al Azmeh (CEU, Budapest)



9.45
Sverre Bagge (CMS, Bergen) - The Christian Church and European State Formation in the Middle Ages

10.15
Discussion

10.30 Coffee Break




II. Islam and Christendom
chaired by József Laszlovszky (CEU, Budapest)


11.00
Aziz Al-Azmeh (CEU, Budapest) – Islam and the Caliphate

11.30
Johannes Niehoff-Panagiotidis (CEU, Budapest) – Apocalyptical Historiography: (Pseudo-)Methodios and the Realm of the Infidels

12.00
Isabel Toral-Niehoff (Freiburg-Budapest) – Polytheistic Kingship? The Case of the Arab Christians in Late Antique Iraq

12.30
Discussion

12.45 Lunch Break




III. Central and South-East European Slavs
chaired by Johannes Niehoff-Panagiotidis (CEU, Budapest)



14.00
Neven Budak (Zagreb University and CEU, Budapest) – Latin Christianity among the Southern Slavs and Early Croatian State

14.30
Irene Barbiera (Padova – CEU Alumna) – Christianity in Slovenia and the Slavs, a Case of Continuity at Kranj Iskra (VI-XI sec. AD)

15.00
Antoanetta Granberg (CMS, Bergen) – Transferred in Translation. Making a State in Early Medieval Bulgarian Genealogies


15.30 Coffee Break


16.00
Eva Doležalová (Prague) – Christianization in Bohemia

16.30 Discussion




IV. Comparative Perspectives
chaired by Aziz Al Azmeh (CEU, Budapest)



17.00
Mychal Tymowski (Warsaw University) – State and Tribe in the History of Black Africa and Early Medieval Europe

17.30
Eszter Spät (CEU Doctoral student) – From Devilworshippers to the Original Kurdish Religion: The Role of the Heterodox Yezidi Kurds in the Creation of a Kurdish National Mythology

18.00
Discussion



March 7, Tuesday



V. Eastern Europe and Hungary
Chaired by Gábor Klaniczay (CEU, Budapest)



9.30
Alexandr Nazarenko (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) – Kirche als politisch konsolidierender Faktor in der Alten Rus

10.00
Anna Kuznetsova (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow - CEU, Budapest, Alumna) – Religion’s element in Laws (Saint Stephen’s and Brzhetislav’s) and their role in state formation

10.30 Coffee Break


11.00
Giedre Mickunaite (Vilnius Academy of Fine Arts - CEU, Budapest, Alumna) - Remembered Saints, Forgotten Rulers, and Imagined Lives in the Thirteenth-Century Lithuania

11.30
Béla Zsolt Szakács(CEU, Budapest) – Problems of Church and State Formation in Hungary, in a Central European comparison

12.00
Előd Nemerkényi (CEU, Budapest, Alumnus) – Greeks and Latins in Medieval Hungary

12.30
Discussion

12.45 Lunch Break




VI. Europe and Scandinavia
Chaired by Sverre Bagge (CMS, Bergen)



14.00
Ildar Garipzanov (CMS, Bergen – CEU, Budapest, Alumnus) – Carolingian renovatio imperii Christiani and Scandinavia

14.30
Thomas Lindquist (Gothenburg) – Conversion and Legitimization of Political Power. Continuity and discontinuity in the making of a Christian monarchy in Sweden

15.00
Kurt Villads Jensen (Odense) – War and peace in the high Middle Ages - Ideological obligations of Christian rulers


15.30 Coffee Break



16.00
General Discussion

16.30
Gábor Klaniczay (CEU, Budapest) and Gerhard Jaritz (CEU, Budapest) – Conclusion



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